OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Prescribed burning

Creating partnerships

Fuels reduction

Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Fire Program

Forests across the western United States are stressed from high tree densities, drought, and insect and disease outbreaks. Past management practices along with more human-caused wildfire and changes in weather are causing wildfires to burn hotter, longer, more frequent, and over greater areas. In 2017, Oregon experienced one of the worst wildfire seasons on record with over 700,000 acres burned across the State resulting in ecological, social, and economic damage. Wildfires cost the state of Oregon millions of dollars each year; and billions across the Nation. Forestry & Natural Resources Extension aims to offers a comprehensive, consistent, and cohesive approach to a Fire Program for all its people.


Click on the Got Science? podcast to listen to the College of Forestry's John Bailey talk about The Science of Forest Fires: Culture, Climate, and CombustionGot Science

In the News


Fire refugia

“Those trees are lifeboats,” said Meg Krawchuk, a fire ecologist at Oregon State University. Writing recently in the journal BioScience, Dr. Krawchuk and her colleagues argued that it’s urgent to better understand fire refugia, because they may be seriously threatened in future decades by climate change. Without them, many species may become threatened and the surrounding ecosystems may take longer to recover from wildfires.


Firefighters

The economic consequences of fire on small communities have been borne out in several studies. Turns out, it’s complicated. Emily Jane Davis, an extension specialist and assistant professor with Oregon State University, conducted an analysis on the economic effects of wildfires on Trinity County, California, an area very much like the Methow Valley.

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